Resorts World Fires Security Director Amid Conflict Of Interest Report

Moonlighting exec's side hustle called his relationship with Mayor Adams into question
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Resorts World Casino fired its security director, Timothy Pearson, just days after a report detailed a potential conflict of interest stemming from Pearson’s employment on Mayor Eric Adams’ staff.

The New York Post first reported Pearson’s dismissal, which came after a report in The New York Times last Wednesday that Pearson also was being paid by the nonprofit New York City Economic Development Corporation (EDC) in his role as Adams’ security advisor. Resorts World is trying to expand its offerings at the Aqueduct racino in Queens, a process that starts with nabbing one of the three available downstate casino licenses.

Adams will have plenty of sway in the conversations this fall about where the three downstate licenses land.

According to the New York Post article, Pearson never informed his Resorts World bosses that he was also being paid by the EDC for his work with Adams. Pearson – a retired NYPD officer lauded for his rescue work after the terror attacks on Sept. 11, 2001 – worked for Resorts World for 10 years prior to the arrangement with the EDC, which began in May.

“Tim is a distinguished hero who served the city for many years as a leader at NYPD,” Resorts World said in a statement. “Tim used those same skills to keep our facility and community safe for over a decade. We support his decision to lend his expertise to the city in its pursuit of making our streets safer, and we wish him well.”

Resorts World bidding for casino license

Resorts World, along with MGM’s property in Yonkers, is considered a likely recipient of one of the three licenses, with both sites boasting advantages in speed-to-market and local political conditions. Both sites already have video-terminal casinos and, in Resorts World’s case, a hotel.

Each proposal will be reviewed by a local advisory board for that location, which will include the mayor, the borough president, a city council member, a state senator, and a member of the State Assembly. The boards have the power to block or approve any new casino licenses.

While EDC has no formal role in the regulatory or selection process, it could offer Adams’ office input on casino proposals.

In a statement issued to the Post, Adams’ office pointed out that Pearson had “a long and distinguished career in both the public and private sectors, where he has spent decades keeping New Yorkers safe and creating security plans that have protected millions.”

Photo: Shutterstock

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